The Right Type of Alert for the Right Result

A cybersecurity strategy is intended to safeguard an organization’s data and systems. This includes alerts whenever suspicious activity is detected, as well as an automated response to block the attack. Unfortunately, no security system is perfect, and there will be false alarms. Technology has altered the way we live and work, as well as the way criminals operate. Criminals used to have to physically break into a building or bank to commit a crime. Criminals can now commit crimes from anywhere in the world by going online. This has made it difficult for organizations to keep up with the evolving criminal landscape. One way organizations have adapted to this change is by utilizing computer security systems designed to detect and defend against cyberattacks. These systems operate by monitoring network activity for signs of an attack. This includes both alerts and an automated response whenever suspicious activity is detected.

What is a true positive alert?

A true positive alert is one that accurately identifies a potential problem. This means that the alert is neither false positive nor false negative. A true positive alert can assist you in avoiding potential problems and maintaining the smooth operation of your system.

What is a false positive alert?

A false positive alert is one that is generated when there is no actual threat present. This can be aggravating for users because it can lead to them wasting time investigating a false alarm. False positives can occur in a variety of ways, including:

  1. System error: Sometimes false positives are caused by a system glitch. This could be due to a software bug or a sensor issue.

  2. User error: User error is another common cause of false positives. This can occur if the user does not properly configure the system or if the alarm is accidentally triggered.

  3. Environmental influences: Environmental influences can also result in false positives.

What is a true negative alert?

A true negative alert is one that correctly detects the absence of a problem. In contrast, a false negative occurs when an alert incorrectly determines that there is no problem. True negative alerts are classified into two types: those generated by a monitoring system and those generated by a human. True negative alerts generated by monitoring systems are typically the result of the system correctly identifying that a condition does not exist. For example, if a system is checking to see if a server is up and the server is, a true negative alert will be generated. True negative alerts generated by humans are typically the result of a human manually checking a condition and discovering that it is not met.

What is a false negative alert?

What exactly is a false negative alert? When a system incorrectly identifies a normal event as an anomaly, it generates a false negative alert. This can have serious ramifications because it can create a false sense of security. A false negative alert can even be used to exploit a system in some cases. False negatives can occur due to a variety of factors, including human error, hardware or software malfunctions, and malicious activity. It’s critical to be aware of the risk of false negatives and to have systems in place to mitigate it. Using multiple detection methods is one way to reduce the possibility of false negatives.

Final Words

There are four types of alerts: true positive, false positive, true negative, and false negative. A true positive alert is one that is generated correctly and results in the desired outcome. A false positive alert occurs when an alert is generated incorrectly and does not result in the desired outcome. A true negative alert is one that is correctly generated but does not produce the desired result. A false negative alert occurs when an alert is generated incorrectly and results in the desired outcome.

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